Thanks Lunchbox for bringing this to our attention.

It looks as though a folder has appeared behind the windows on http://www.scariestthingieversaw.com . I'm not sure when it first appeared, but the folder name is "braegen14" and it contains a file named "expcnv.dat". With that knowledge I went back into the PDP-11 simulator to see if any other commands now worked using this new file. I figured since the "RSCOM8.DAT" was the file that allowed us to print the "Rocket Poppeteers" newspaper articles and this new one was also a .DAT file, that we may get lucky.

The .PRINT and .COMT didn't produce any results, but the .EXEC did. If you type ".EXEC EXPCNV" (without quotes) into the terminal, another window pops up asking for the Path of an external source and that's as far as I got (not anymore, keep reading). I tried entering a bunch of different things into the "Path" field that appear somewhere within the terminal emulator; TU56, DECtape, DEV1, DD1... but nothing worked. I also tried paths to places on my actual machine with no luck...

UPDATE: PATH DISCOVERED: It was actually pretty obvious once you think about it. "morbus" over at unfiction figured out the path is "/desktop/Braegen14/expcnv.dat" (no quotes) which would make sense since that's the location of the file on the desktop emulator that we're looking at. So if you plug that in the path device box you will hear a strange audio file...

UPDATE 2: Download the audio file HERE

So now that there's something new, start digging and let us know what you find!

Update 3: I took the liberty of checking out "Mills'" tip from the comments about Braegen 14 being a disk drive in itself and this is what I found on the Soundstream wikipedia page (which I found simply by typing Braegen 14 into google)

The Digital Editing System

Soundstream’s digital editing system was the first instance of a computer used to edit commercial recordings. It consisted of a Digital Equipment PDP 11/60 computer, Soundstream’s interface to transfer data between its recorder and the computer’s disks (a pair of Braegen 14" disk drives), digital-to-analog playback hardware, and editing software. For all intents and purposes, this system was the very first digital audio workstation. In addition to its own facility, Soundstream installed editing systems at Paramount Pictures (Hollywood), RCA (New York), and Bertelsmann (Germany). A system was delivered to the U.S. Department of Justice to aid the analysis of bootleg recordings.

Editing could be performed at sample accuracy (i.e., 1/50,000 of a second); any mixing was performed digitally.

The sound system in the editing room in the Salt Lake facility used a Threshold SL-10 preamp, a Sumo "The Power" amp, and Infinity RS4.5 speakers.

Probably not going to lead us to another clue, but it's kind of interesting none the less, especially the connection to the PDP-11 computer and Paramount Pictures.

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